StopPovertyNow.org , a Grameen Foundation initiative to spread awareness of global poverty and bring and end to this global epidemic

From reader Sarah:

Please join this effort by sharing this StopPovertyNow.org movement with your readers.

Consider:

► One billion people live on less than $1 a day
► One-in-five people live without adequate water or food
► 26,000 children die each day from preventable causes
You will join a worldwide movement to Stop Poverty Now. Thanks to passionate individuals like you, Grameen Foundation and its local partners have served more than 6 million families with microfinance so that they have a better
tomorrow. With more of us engaged, we can Stop Poverty Now. A donation of as little as $10 to Grameen Foundation will add your voice to
this important cause.

How it works:
Log onto StopPovertyNow.org and see a client whose life was changed by Microfinance.

Help us bring that picture to life. Select a portion of the picture to fill in.

Add your voice to the picture by sharing an inspirational message and/or a picture that tells others why you want to Stop Poverty Now.

You will join a worldwide movement to Stop Poverty Now. Thanks to passionate individuals like you, Grameen Foundation and its local partners have served more than 6 million families with microfinance so that they have a better tomorrow. With more of us engaged, we can Stop Poverty Now.

Unintended Consequences: Malaria Nets Used For Fishing

Insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) are a simple, cost-effective way to fight malaria and are distributed to pregnant women and children in Kenya, often for free. But when Noboru Minakawa of the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Nagasaki, Japan, and colleagues surveyed villages along Lake Victoria, they found people were using the nets for fishing or drying fish, because the fish dry faster in the nets than on papyrus sheets, and the nets are cheaper (Malaria Journal, DOI:

Link

Favorite Charities Of Economists

If readers want to donate for nets, one good organization I have supported in the past is here. TamTam provides nets free at clinics. Personally I think this approach makes sense because charging dramatically reduces use, free distribution can help encourage mothers to come to antenatal clinics, and, like vaccines, insecticide treated nets can help interfere with disease transmission creating positive externalities. For some evidence on the first issue, see this paper.

One of the best buys out there is treating kids for worms. Two billion people have intestinal worms worldwide, including 400 million school-children. The medicine costs pennies per dose. Because the medicine is cheap and safe, but diagnosis is expensive, the World Health Organization recommends mass treatment in schools in areas of high prevalence, which can keep total costs per treated child to $0.25

Based on the evidence, several economists, including Esther Duflo, Kristin Forbes,and me, are involved in, and have donated to, a new group called Deworm the World. Information is available here. There is a donate button which explains how people can give.

Link to Mankiw Blog.

“How Businesses Can Develop Trust on a Global Scale Through Corporate Service”

How Businesses Can Develop Trust on a

Global Scale Through Corporate Service

(Technology + Entrepreneurship) ^ Corporate Service = Δ Social Impact

Today, the Internet has made global flows of information, capital and innovation possible as never before. How do we use technologies, economies, entrepreneurship and corporate service to make organizations smarter and build trust on a global scale across borders, time zones and cultural expectations? A distinguished panel of experts will examine how governments, NGOs, educational institutions, and private corporations have increased social capacity by successfully applying technology and entrepreneurship to public service. In addition to improving society, the panel will discuss the unique benefits their organizations derive by fostering innovative public service.

PANEL: – Stanley Litow, Vice President, Corporate Affairs and Corporate Responsibility, IBM
- Dr. Augustine Mahiga, Permanent Representative of the United Republic of Tanzania to
the United Nations.
- Sally Susnowitz, Director, MIT Public Service Center
- Harris Wofford, Former US Senator (D-PA)

MODERATOR: Bruce Bachenheimer, Chapter Chair, MIT Enterprise Forum of New York City & Clinical Professor of Management, Pace University


DATE:

Thursday, January 15, 2009

TIME:

5:30pm – 6:00pm: Reception
6:00pm – 7:30pm: Panel Discussion
7:30pm – 8:30pm: Networking

PLACE:

Goodwin Procter LLP – DIRECTIONS
The New York Times Building
620 Eighth Avenue
New York, NY 10018-1405

REGISTRATION:

Free to members of MIT Enterprise Forum
$50 non-members, $10 extra at door
All members and guests are welcome.

If you can no longer attend this event, please
open the event announcement from our
Event List, click on the event registration link,
select the Please cancel registration for this event
button and then hit Submit.